Tuesday, August 4, 2009

Perky Pet Oriole Birdfeeder - Giveaway #2

THE GREAT GARDEN GIVEAWAY BONANZA #2



We're now on the second day of THE GREAT GARDEN GIVEAWAY BONANZA, sponsored by Birdfeeders.com, and this is what you have to look forward to -- This wonderful Perky-Pet Oriole Birdfeeder!
As well as being a brightly colored bird, the oriole has a lovely song. It's clear and carries a long way.
I admit to not having much luck enticing them my way. One year I had a male and female eating my oranges, but I didn't have a feeder with the nectar they are so fond of. I suspect they found "greener pastures." Well, not anymore. Next spring I plan to put out my wonderful new feeder made especially for them. It has a clear glass container with bright metal oranges on the side, their favorite color and flavor. It comes with a nice chain for easy hanging and a wire perch where they can rest while they sup.




This nectar, much like the hummingbird nectar of yesterday's post, is specially prepared to the oriole's liking. It's a no-muss, no-fuss kind of thing, that I really appreciate. I'm sure the orioles next spring will be flocking my way.

These two items could be yours, if you just take the time to enter this giveaway sponsored by Birdfeeders.com.

1. Leave a comment about something you learned at the Birdfeeders.com site.
 
2. For a second chance to win, sign up as an e-mail subscriber with Feedburner, Feed Blitz, or become a Google Follower (see sidebar.) Then leave a second comment telling me you have subscribed or that you are already a subscriber.
If you subscribe in more than one way, leave a separate comment for each.

3. For a third chance to win, blog or Tweet about this contest with a link here, then come back and leave another comment telling me about it.
 
4. If you're not a blogger, be sure to leave your contact e-mail address like this to avoid spammers: pianananna(at)gmail(dot)com. If I don't have a way to reach you or you don't respond in three days, your name will be disqualified, and I will choose again, picking my favorite answer.
Good Luck!!
 
Open to US residents only, 18+.
Winners will be chosen by random.org.
Email addresses will not be shared with any third parties.
This Giveaway ends on Monday, August 10, 2009 at midnight ET

Watch the sidebar for links to all 10 giveaways!


Don't forget to visit An Herbal Bedfellow for healthy recipes made with herbs, and also my newest blog:
Happenstance House -- A journal about my Victorian home and all of it's contents.

150 comments:

Kelly F said...

I learned that another method for attracting birds is through the inclusion of bird baths and bird houses in your yard.

wordsmoveme at gmail dot com

Kelly F said...

I follow on google friends!

wordsmoveme at gmail dot com

ScrewLucy said...

The Downy Woodpecker is the smallest and most prevalent woodpecker in North America.

ScrewLucy said...

I follow via feedburner!

cdziuba said...

I learned that you can search for birdwatching locations on their site. Here's the format of one locale:

Bird Watching Locations in Northwest US



Location:
St Lawrence Island, Alaska

Birds:
Over 1 million birds to view during their 24-hour days in the month of June. Birds include:

Horned Puffin
Eiders
Emperor Goose
Yellow-Billed Loon
Parakeet, and
Many Shorebirds

cdziuba said...

follower

cdziuba said...

email subscriber

cdziuba said...

Tweeted http://twitter.com/cdziuba/status/3122744823

cdziuba said...

Blogged http://ceeceeblogger.blogspot.com/2009/08/thyme-for-herbs-great-garden-giveaway.html

TRUN said...

I learned I can search for Bird Watching locations on their site which is cool if you are going to be on vacation somewhere.

Stacy said...

I learned that it is believed that the first hummingbird species developed during the ice age. Didn't know that!

Stacy said...

Tweeted at http://twitter.com/smquaseb

Dipsy said...

I learned that there are over 10,000 species of birds and that bird watching is becoming a popular hobby in the States.

Dipsy said...

Dipsy at zttmm1314{at}yahoo{dot}{com} signed up for emails!

Linda said...

I learned that birds must keep their feathers clean to be able to fly properly.
lgrieser(at)sbcglobal(dot)net

barbara.montyj said...

Something I learned.
Birds must keep their feathers clean to be able to fly properly.
So I'm going to look at birdbaths.

barbara.montyj said...

I'm a google follower.

barbara.montyj said...

Tweet
http://twitter.com/JalapenoMama/status/3126799287

Anonymous said...

I learned about what a baffle is and what they are used for! I have a problem with squirrels getting into the bird feeder, and having a slick surfaced dome, would easily fix that problem!

mzpaw@yahoo.com

Country Wings in Phoenix said...

I learned that the Brown Headed Cowbird female does not build her own nest. Instead, she waits until another bird temporarily leaves its nest of eggs, then she places her eggs in the nest with the other eggs and lets the unwitting bird raise them as her own. I have never known a species that did this. How strange? Thanks for sharing these tips. Country Hugs, Sherry

Country Wings in Phoenix said...

I am a google follower. Many thanks for this wonderful give away. I mean who doesn't love learning about and feeding the birds. Thanks for sharing. Country Hugs, Sherry

theflyingacc said...

I never knew that birds did not fly well after a bath>> they always jump in a tree or tomato plant, but I thought they were looking for little bugs. I do not know if I have orioles, but then I never had a feeder for them!

Thank you again for a lovely contest.

Element said...

1. learned about the Migration of Hummingbirds and why they migrate.

Element said...

I am now following you through Google follower

Element said...

Just tweeted about the contest.

mverno said...

over 10,000 species of birds mverno@roadrunner.com

CathyH said...

I learned virginia creeper provides food for the birds. My new home's property is covered with it!

CathyH said...

blog follower

S Denton said...

I learned that different humming bird feeders have built in protection against bees and ants

Danielle said...

I learned you can try to deter birds from colliding with or attacking your windows by Breaking up the reflection with stickers or plastic wrap.

drellis500(At)gmail.com

lmurley2000 said...

i found out that they have a bird feeder for oriole birds. thanks

lmurley2000 said...

i'm a email subscriber.. thanks

spitfyr323 said...

I learned this about the Northern Cardinal: "The brighter the male, the more plentiful the food is in its territory and the better its chance of bearing offspring."

spitfyr323 at hotmail dot com

spitfyr323 said...

I'm an e-mail subscriber!

spitfyr323 at hotmail dot com

Kerri said...

I found the following info helpful: Place your bird bath in the shade, near trees or shrubs if possible. The shade keeps the water from evaporating quickly and keeps it fresher.
Birds wet from bathing don't fly well, so they're more vulnerable to predators. Shrubbery nearby gives them a safe place to hide while they preen and dry off.

The oriole feeder is so pretty!

blabla3269 said...

I now know there are over 10,000 types of birds out there

Ken said...

I know there are plenty of different birds. Tried to feed oriel but feeder was leaking. This one looks very sturdy.

Ken said...

Have subscribed to newsletter

Anonymous said...

Love the idea of encouraging people to leave birdfeeders out year round (with feed).
Love seeing birds eating at my birdfeeder.

dr_dave7Qhotmail.com

sweepmom said...

I never knew there were so many different types of Orioles. The site shows 7.

hondaray6 said...

I never knew there was such a thing as hummer feeders with bee protectors! I'm having a terrible time with bees driving off the hummers this year. Thanks!
hondaray6 at hotmail dot com

hondaray6 said...

I subscribe via google reader

hondaray6 said...

That is the cutest oriole feeder! I've never had them here but would love to!
I follow on twitter and tweeted-
http://twitter.com/hondaray6/status/3144321065

hondaray6 said...

I follow your blog- hondaray6

iggysaysno said...

I learned that Anna’s are known for consuming more insects than the typical hummingbird. Sadly enough, bees and wasps may become impaled on the bill of an Anna's Hummingbird, causing the bird to starve to death.

Deborah said...

I learned that putting your feeder near trumpeting flowers will help attract more birds. asthenight at gmail dot com

Deborah said...

I'm already signed up as a Google follower. asthenight at gmail dot com

Deborah said...

Tweet! http://twitter.com/AsTheNight/status/3145875685 asthenight at gmail dot com

Danielle said...

follower
drellis500(AT)gmail.com

Danielle said...

email subscriber.
drellis500(AT)gmail.com

Danielle said...

tweet http://twitter.com/drellis500/status/3146657178
drellis500(aT)gmail.com

Patti K said...

I love cardinals, but never knew what I just read on the site. the males are the typical red that everyone recognizes as a cardinal, but the females are actually mostly grey.

texasheartland said...

Though it's kinda gross, the Common Grackle lets ants crawl up its body, most likely to eat any parasites that are clinging to its body. Interesting!


texas_heartland84[at]yahoo[dot]com

llinda29 said...

You can buy at ACE hardware

Nelsby said...

I learned that you should place your bird bath in the shade, near trees or shrubs if possible. The shade keeps the water from evaporating quickly and keeps it fresher.

Thanks!
Aimee
sierranelsby (at) gmail (dot) com

Nelsby said...

I am following your blog.
Thanks!
Aimee
sierranelsby (at) gmail (dot) com

Nelsby said...

I subscribe to your blog feed via email.
Thanks!
Aimee
sierranelsby (at) gmail (dot) com

Nelsby said...

I subscribe to your blog's RSS feed on Google Reader.
Thanks!
Aimee
sierranelsby (at) gmail (dot) com

Nelsby said...

Tweet: http://twitter.com/Nelsby/status/3148537170
Thanks!
Aimee
sierranelsby (at) gmail (dot) com

Sunnyvale said...

I learned they have a squirrel be gone I'll have to tell our son about. This giveaway item is SO pretty!

lsfish said...

A clean and reliable water source is an excellent way to attract birds to your yard, especially those birds that do not necessarily eat seed or nectar.

Sara and Alex said...

The Altamira Oriole is the largest Oriole found within the United States. Its singing has been described as “loud and musical…reminiscent of an inexperienced whistler.”
saradavis1 at gmail

Sara and Alex said...

google follower

sphinx63 said...

I learned that hummingbirds have the ability to hover in mid-air, thanks to their up to 80 wing-flaps per second!

sphinxcw at aol dot com

scarlette10 said...

I learned alot in their "birdwatching section"

Anonymous said...

The Anna’s Hummingbird was named after Anna Massena, Duchess of Rivoli, a European noblewoman in Italy during the 19th century.

oldnehamkin at yahoo dot com

exotic1 said...

I first learned from reading your review how to attract the bird of song Oriole. I had no idea they had a bird feeder similar to the hummingbird feeder just them. I knew about them being attracted by oranges but not about this special feeder. Then I checked out birdfeeders.com and found out that The colorful Baltimore Orioles inhabit the eastern part of North America. The Baltimore Oriole winters in Florida and southward to the Caribbean. I wish I could attract them to my whimsical garden. With this feeder I just might be able to. Thanks for Sharing and for Caring~!

exotic1 said...

I'm subscribed via google reader. It's more like my evening news paper lol but more interesting and not so depressing.
Have fun in the sun~!

exotic1 said...

I tweeted @twitter about this wonderful review and giveaway
http://twitter.com/exotic1/status/3157847505
exotic1

SunnyView said...

I learned that Allen's Hummingbirds breed in a small strip of land along the Pacific Coast, starting in southwest Oregon and continuing into southern California.

Thanks for the giveaway!

SunnyView said...

I subscribed via reader (sunnyview99)!

SunnyView said...

I followed on blogger (Sunny View)!

SunnyView said...

I tweeted: http://twitter.com/sunnyview99/status/3158944985

clynsg said...

I looked at their birdwatching location chart and they only have one site listed for the entire central US. That is unfortunate, since I know there are several locations in OK alone where there are large numbers of birds go through on migrations.

clynsg at yahoo.com

clynsg said...

Blog follower


clynsg at yahoo.com

Anonymous said...

I learned that hummingbirds migrate (which I didn't know).

adr1001025[at]msn.com

Anonymous said...

I tweeted.

http://twitter.com/atd1496/status/3167944218

adr1001025[at]msn.com

Anonymous said...

I'm a google follower.

adr1001025[at]msn.com

amy mayer said...

I learned that it is believed that the first hummingbird species developed during the ice age. (comment by bajjmayer@aol.com)

sfyates said...

I like the perky bird cedar and metro feeders. I learned that bird put ants in their feathers to reduce parasites.

katscorner said...

I learned that you have top filling hummingbird feeders

Madam Pince said...

I learned that birds need to keep their wings clean to fly properly (makes sense), so I need to add a birdbath to all my birdfeeders and suet cages.

Thanks!

sibabe64 said...

The Downy Woodpecker is the smallest in the US

TZel said...

I learned that goldfinches are one of the few birds that can eat upside-down! Thanks!

heatherzilla said...

I learned:
"have the ability to hover in mid-air, thanks to their up to 80 wing-flaps per second."

Brenda said...

I learned that the smallest bird in the US and Canada is the Calliope Hummingbird.

schnoodleDo said...

I learned that Orioles will feed from basically a hummingbird feeder! I had no idea. My parents use grape jelly and it's a big hit with the orioles

schnoodleDo said...

Already a subscriber

schnoodleDo said...

Tweet: http://twitter.com/schnoodleDo/status/3184785080

Anonymous said...

I learned you can attracct birds through bird houses, bird feeders and bird baths.

bgcchs(at)yahoo(dot)com

Anonymous said...

I subscribe via email.

bgcchs(at)yahoo(dot)com

sunnymum said...

I learned that the shape of your birdfeeder can help deter aggressive, unwanted birds.

sunnymum said...

I'm also a subscriber. cbeargie (at) yahoo.com

Dwalline said...

I learned the Hummingbird feeders should be hung out of direct sunlight,

Dwalline said...

Im a google follower

Dwalline said...

Im an email subscriber

Dwalline said...

http://twitter.com/dwalline/statuses/3187582873

Hues262 said...

I didn't know orioles needed a bird feeder.

hues262@yahoo.com

msmouse871 said...

That hummingbirds do a non-stop flight of up to 500 miles, which takes approximately 18-22 hours.

theflyingacc said...

IF ORIOLE'S EAT ON HUMMINGBIRD FEEDERS>> WHY ARE THEY NOT IN MY YARD?
THANK YOU FOR ANOTHER CHANCE AT A WONDERFUL PRIZE

Pam said...

I learned they also carry BEAUTIFUL bird baths. I love the Birdscapes Standing Bath.

Thanks so much!
pamelashockley(AT)netscape(DOT)net

Pam said...

I'm a follower.

Thanks so much!
pamelashockley(AT)netscape(DOT)net

Pam said...

I learned that bird houses should be of untreated wood.

Thanks so much!
pamelashockley(AT)netscape(DOT)net

Pam said...

I'm a follower.

Thanks so much!
pamelashockley(AT)netscape(DOT)net

Chris said...

I learned that different humming bird feeders have built in protection against bees and ants

chromiumman said...

learned that hummingbirds have the ability to hover in mid-air, thanks to their up to 80 wing-flaps per second

erma said...

I learned the Downy Woodpecker is the smallest and most prevalent woodpecker in North America, cool.
erma.hurtt@sbcglobal.net

Molly K said...

I learned that there are several different kinds of orioles, they all have certain aspects that make them very recognizable especially the bright coloring of the male orioles.

Molly K said...

I subscribe.

Molly K said...

I follow.

Candie said...

I did not know that Hummingbirds migrated. Thank you

candieluster(at)gmail(dot)com

djgroz said...

there are over 10,000 species of birds and that bird watching is becoming a popular hobby in the States.
Thanks for the chance to win a prize.

mogrill said...

The shape of your birdfeeder can actually make a difference in what birds visit. Thanks for the chance.
mogrill@comcast.net

Tonya said...

I learned that the male Ruby-Throated Hummingbird is smaller than the female.

TXsunlover said...

I learned that black oil sunflower seeds are a favorite among most birds.
Thanks for the chance to win!
proudyaya04 {at} yahoo {dot} com

TXsunlover said...

I subscribe!
proudyaya04 {at} yahoo {dot} com

Kate said...

I learned that Allen's Hummingbirds breed in a small strip of land along the Pacific Coast, starting in southwest Oregon and continuing into southern California.

strycker@slu.edu

Hotsnotty2 said...

I learned that raccoon & Squirrel Repellents will not harm wild birds. Theis main ingredient is usually capsaicin pepper which is annoying to squirrels and raccoons. Birds cannot smell it, therefore they will not be harmed.

Hotsnotty2@hotmail.com

Axyro said...

Birds need to keep their feathers clean in order to fly properly. Huh, I guess there is a point to birdbaths beyond aesthetics.

Dree said...

Planting some fruit-or-berry-bearing shrubs and trees can help attract birds.

intime said...

Birds may face dangers in their everyday lives both while eating, flying, or perching. The danger may be from one of their own kind who feels his territory has been invaded.


intime@myself.com

Tracy said...

The garden bowls for hiding the hose @ birdfeeders.com is a great idea.

I just love Orioles! I remember when my grandparents used to feed them oranges outside their kitchen window.

teachesminds(at)yahoo(dot)com

Deb said...

I learned there are humminbird feeders with bee control. Thanks for the giveaway.

kngmckellar said...

I learned that there are over 10,000 species of birds!

kngmckellar@hotmail.com

kngmckellar said...

subscribed to email
kngmckellar@hotmail.com

kngmckellar said...

http://twitter.com/kngmckellar

kngmckellar@hotmail.com

Elsie said...

Hummingbirds migrate great distances, which amazes me...they are so small and seem so fragile, and I am blessed to have a regular hummingbird visitor now!

pumpkinlady430@yahoo.com

purango said...

Black-Oil Sunflower is preferred by the greatest variety of birds. garrettsambo@aol.com

k2k said...

I just learned on birdfeeder. com that nyjer seed goes bad in 6 months. Oops.
krkury at gmail dot com
K2K

k2k said...

I've subscribed!
krkury at gmail dot com
K2K

Terri L said...

I didn't realize that it was best to hang bird feeders in a southeastern area of the house.

tlannan30[at]yahoo[dot]com

coriwestphal said...

I learned that you can order replacement parts for birdfeeders from their site. Who knew? If I had a birdfeeder break, I'd probably just throw it away and buy a new one. What a waste!

coriwestphal said...

I'm an email subscriber.

coriwestphal said...

I'm a feed subscriber via google reader.

coriwestphal said...

I'm a follower.

coriwestphal said...

Tweet: http://twitter.com/coriwestphal/statuses/3229924964

kathy pease said...

When purchasing a tube feeder, check to see how easily it can be filled. If you are purchasing a triple tube bird feeder, check to see if the ports can be switched from mixed seed to thistle/nyjer.

kathy pease said...

following your blog as klp1965
kathy pease

kathy pease said...

http://twitter.com/klp1965/status/3233159802

phyllisg said...

I did not know oriole birds feed from a separate feeder. They must be picky eaters.

Anonymous said...

Birds love security and cleanliness with nutrition/hydration. Find these and your birds will be present. thanks, raymondw345@AOl.com

artmarcia said...

I love the style of the squirrel-proof Birdscapes® The Preserve™ feeder.

artmarcia said...

Following on Google Friend Connect.

lilyk said...

I learned that tube feeders are usually made of a clear plastic tube and can have either plastic or metal caps, bases and perches.

lilyk@mail2world.com

lilyk said...

I subscribed by email.

lilyk@mail2world.com

tanya said...

I learned that goldfinches are one of the few birds that can eat upside-down.

metrofmc at aol dot com

RR said...

Birds must keep their feathers clean in order to fly properly.

Laurie Harrison said...

http://www.birdfeeders.com/advice/bird-library/orioles
At this link, I learned there are a lot of different orioles. I live in WY and this is the first Spring I seen so many and the hummingbird population was way down. We had a hard freeze in June so I suppose that had something to do with it.
Thanks for the chance.
geneveve2 at gmail dot come

Laurie Harrison said...

I follow your blog
geneveve2 at gmail dot com
Also, I didn't know Orioles had special feeders. They sure tipped my hummingbird ones around.

Laurie Harrison said...

https://twitter.com/#!/GrandmaSezSo/status/92997992000397314
I tweeted to my Twitter followers on this giveaway
geneveve2 at gmail dot com