Wednesday, August 5, 2009

Perky Pet Hummingbird Feeder - Giveaway #3


THE GREAT GARDEN GIVEAWAY BONANZA #3


Here we are on day three of THE GREAT GARDEN GIVEAWAY BONANZA! I can't believe how generous Birdfeeders.com have been to sponsor the first six days of my ten day giveaway!
Today they are offering this lovely hummingbird feeder. The tag says Top fill-No Spill. The one I use now has to be unscrewed from the bottom, which means I have to turn it upside down each time before I unscrew it to empty it out and refill. If I forget, which I do often, I spill sticky old nectar all over myself. This feeder solves that problem completely. It has a wide mouth top which is wonderful for pouring in the sweetened nectar. The bright red-color and magnolia blossoms are just what is needed to attract the hummers.


Don't forget about this instant nectar from Perky Pet. It's easy to mix and easy to use. Since you should change the liquid at least every other day to be sure it's fresh, ease in mixing is a must.

These handy cleaning mops from Perky Pets have proved to be extremely helpful in keeping a clean feeding site for my favorite little birds.
You can find all of these items at Birdfeeders.com, BUT you can also enter to win all three. Here's how:

1. Leave a comment about something you learned at the Birdfeeders.com site.


2. For a second chance to win, sign up as an e-mail subscriber with Feedburner, Feed Blitz, or become a Google Follower (see sidebar.) Then leave a second comment telling me you have subscribed or that you are already a subscriber.
If you subscribe in more than one way, leave a separate comment for each.

3. For a third chance to win, blog or Tweet about this contest with a link here, then come back and leave another comment telling me about it.


4. If you're not a blogger, be sure to leave your contact e-mail address like this to avoid spammers: pianananna(at)gmail(dot)com. If I don't have a way to reach you or you don't respond in three days, your name will be disqualified, and I will choose again, picking my favorite answer.

Good Luck!!


Open to US residents only, 18+.
Winners will be chosen by random.org.
Email addresses will not be shared with any third parties.
This Giveaway ends on Tuesday August 11 at midnight ET.

Watch the side bar for links to all 10 giveaways!
Don't forget to visit An Herbal Bedfellow for healthy recipes made with herbs, and also my newest blog:
Happenstance House -- A journal about my Victorian home and all of it's contents.

174 comments:

TRUN said...

I learned that you can find great tips for birdfeeding on their site along with a ton other info - I still like the location search.

Anonymous said...

Would love to feed the hummingbirds

Anonymous said...

would love to feed the hummingbirds

Marilyn said...

I had NO idea that there was so many different kinds of hummingbirds..

hondaray6 said...

I too am amazed at how many different hummingbirds there are. Here in Maine we only have the Ruby Throated ones, which are beautiful, but it would be great to see some of the others too! Thanks for sharing Birdfeeders.com with us!
hondaray6 at hotmail dot com

hondaray6 said...

I subscribe via google reader

hondaray6 said...

I follow your blog

hondaray6 said...

I follow on twitter and tweeted
http://twitter.com/hondaray6/status/3144332208

barbara.montyj said...

This is quite interesting.
In Alaska there are over 1 million birds to view during their 24-hour days in the month of June.
I'm a birder in MN and we do not have that many different birds.

barbara.montyj said...

I'm a follower.

barbara.montyj said...

Tweet!
http://twitter.com/JalapenoMama/status/3146586759

Linda said...

Birds need a water supply to keep their feathers clean to be able to fly properly.
lgrieser(at)sbcglobal(dot)net

texasheartland said...

I didn't know that male Allen's Hummingbirds are very aggressive and territorial!


texas_heartland84[at]yahoo[dot]com

slb3334 said...

There are a lot of different kinds of hummingbirds.

Danetta said...

I learned that hummingbirds can be especially territorial and aggressive birds.
talonsmom731 at gmail dot com

Danetta said...

I am a Google follower.
talonsmom731 at gmail dot com

Danetta said...

I blogged about this giveaway
http://goyay.blogspot.com/2009/08/thyme-for-herbs-great-garden-giveaway.html
talonsmom731 at gmail dot com

Amanda S. said...

I learned that Male Ruby-throats will set out first for the coast, followed by the females who will depart approximately 10 days later.

barbara said...

I learned that I'm supposed to place my bird bath in the shade, near trees or shrubs if possible. The shade keeps the water from evaporating quickly and keeps it fresher. That's the opposite of what I was told, which was that birds want the bird bath to be out in the open so they can see any predators that might be around.

barbara said...

I'm a google follower

barbara said...

I tweeted: http://twitter.com/bsw529/status/3148881096

MOMFOREVERANDEVER said...

I was told to have the bird bath out in the open too opposite of what the site says- hmm- which one is correct- maybe it depens on locations and bird types

Anonymous said...

I LEARNED THAT HUMMINGBIRDS DO NOT FLY IN FLOCKS, EVEN THOUGH THEY MIGRATE.

allegro966@yahoo.com

Sara and Alex said...

I learned Anna’s are known for consuming more insects than the typical hummingbird. Sadly enough, bees and wasps may become impaled on the bill of an Anna's Hummingbird, causing the bird to starve to death.
saradavis1 at gmail

Sara and Alex said...

follower

theflyingacc said...

I learned that the birds love the bugs on my deck good thing it is natural>> not the baths that I moved this morning and flowers>>I thought it was me..

thank you for the chance to win

Rita M said...

I learned that they carry a huge assortment of feeders - from traditional to whimsical to state-of-the-art top-fill feeders.

cdziuba said...

I learned:

So why do hummingbirds migrate?

It is believed that the first hummingbird species developed during the ice age. They have always been considered tropical birds, and the majority of them are still today, however, when the layers of ice withdrew from North America the hummingbirds saw an opportunity to discover a new land.

cdziuba said...

email subscriber cdziuba@aol.com

cdziuba said...

follower

cdziuba said...

I follow on twitter (cdziuba) and tweeted http://twitter.com/cdziuba/status/3153407252

cdziuba said...

blogged http://ceeceeblogger.blogspot.com/2009/08/perky-pet-hummingbird-feeder-giveaway.html

Gena said...

Very unusual - they sell replacement parts for their feeders.

Gena said...

I follow

dogdazzle said...

I learned you may have to wait several weeks for birds to discover your feeder.

CathyH said...

Humming birds can fly nonstop 500 miles in 18-22 hours. So a bird at my house could be at my sister's house (400 miles) in a day!

CathyH said...

i follow

js22 said...

To create your own bird haven, you will want to start with the three essentials: food, water and shelter.

Thanks for the giveaway!
email in blogger profile.

js22 said...

I subscribed to your blog's RSS feed via google reader.

email in blogger profile.

js22 said...

I follow your blog via google friend connect.

email in blogger profile.

js22 said...

tweet- http://twitter.com/js22222222/status/3154393217

email in blogger profile.

Anonymous said...

The large number of types of huming birds.

dr_dave7@hotmail.com

Emilie said...

Most hummingbirds spend the winter between Central Mexico and Panama

emvark at gmail dot com

Emilie said...

Following on blogger!

emvark at gmail dot com

exotic1 said...

I never gave much thought about where to hang a bird bath. I just figured a nice sunny spot so they can dry off in the sun and I could enjoy watching them but I found a tip at birdfeeders.com that I was doing this all wrong. I should of Placed my bird bath in the shade, near trees or shrubs if possible. The shade keeps the water from evaporating quickly and keeps it fresher. I learn something new each day and today I learned 3 things from reading your reviews and visiting birdfeeders.com. Thanks so Much~!

exotic1 said...

I'm a subscriber via google reader.
I just love your blog set up~!
exotic1

exotic1 said...

Follow and Tweeted @twitter about this review and giveaway.
http://twitter.com/exotic1/status/3158074926
exotic1

blabla3269 said...

I found out lots of ways to attract hummingbirds not just by using the feeder I have

sweetsue said...

I learned that the best bird baths have a shallow basin with a slight slope so the birds can wade into the water.
smchester at gmail dot com

sweetsue said...

I have been a follower.
smchester at gmail dot com

Elsie said...

To see the variety of bird feeders is a delight, I never realized how many there could be...the winged visitors are a truly joyful sight to see....

I have a hummingbird that flies in daily, to see my plants and flowers...
I would love this pretty feeder,
To give her a sip, between showers!

pumpkinlady430@yahoo.com

Lorri said...

I learned that you can find out about all kinds of birds on their site. Very nice feature.

Lorri said...

I'm an email subscriber also :)

Deborah said...

I learned that not all birds are attracted to feeders, but you can get them to visit your yard by putting out water. asthenight at gmail dot com

jbeckett said...

I learned that a male house finch's coloring comes from the food that he eats.

sweepmom said...

I learned that if bees, hornets or wasps are invading your feeder, your best bet is to purchase a hummingbird feeder with built-in bee guards. These are mesh-guards that prevent bees and wasps access to the feeding ports.

lsfish said...

I learned: Place your bird bath in the shade, near trees or shrubs if possible. The shade keeps the water from evaporating quickly and keeps it fresher.

lsfish said...

I became a follower of your site. I'm an herb (and everything else) gardener in Michigan too, and I love your site!

ANNE S said...

I learned they can migrate up to 500 miles, which takes approximately 18-22 hours, and the females leave ten days later than the males. Fascinating.

Celeste said...

I learned about the migration of birds...such amazing facts!

contact me at:
celeste@mail4me.com

Celeste said...

Blog follower!

contact me at:
celeste@mail4me.com

iggysaysno said...

The number of Lucifer Hummingbirds in any area corresponds directly to the rainfall and flowering times of the desert plants in that area.

Tina said...

I learned its good to put your bird bath in the shade. I had no idea. I am going to move mine today!

Anonymous said...

Didn't know that there were so many different kinds of hummingbirds. Would sure like to have this please, thanks,

Anonymous said...

Hummingbirds do not fly in flocks it seems.

brandon_ralston@hotmail.com

Karen said...

I learned that hummingbirds migrate!

Anonymous said...

The Anna’s Hummingbird was named after Anna Massena, Duchess of Rivoli, a European noblewoman in Italy during the 19th century.
timgus at cox dot net

Sunnyvale said...

plant fruit or berry bushes to attract the birds

sfyates said...

I love the hummingbirds mine live in little yellow plum trees.

amy mayer said...

I learned that male Allen's Hummingbirds are very aggressive and territorial! (comment by bajjmayer@aol.com)

sibabe64 said...

Hummingbirds do not fly in flocks

Danielle said...

I learned you can try to deter birds from colliding with or attacking your windows by Breaking up the reflection with stickers or plastic wrap.
drellis500(at)gmail.com

Danielle said...

email subscriber.
drellis500(At)gmail.com

Danielle said...

follower.
drellis500(At)gmail.com

Danielle said...

subscribe in google reader.
drellis500(At)gmail.com

llinda29 said...

I learned you can buy this at ace hardware

The Bragging Mommy said...

I learned that when you are hanging a bird feeder you need to hang it at least twelve feet from any tree trunk or limb and at least four feet up from the ground, in order to keep squirrels away.

The Bragging Mommy said...

I follow via google firend connect

thebraggingmommy(at)gmail(dot)com

Anonymous said...

Most of the Magnificent Hummingbird population lives year-round in central Mexico!!!!!

oldnehamkin at yahoo dot com

sphinx63 said...

I learned that Nyjer seed loses its freshness after six months, so purchase often and in small amounts.

sphinxcw at aol dot com

Linda and Greg said...

I Learned that Broad Tailed Hummingbirds hunt insects!

TZel said...

I learned that "Black-Oil Sunflower seeds attract cardinals, chickadees, nuthatches, titmice and jays." i am surprised that chickadees are attracted to them- thanks for this chance!

dctm said...

I learned that there are several types of hummingbirds,which I never knew.

Christie
dctm at bellsouth dot net

Kerri said...

I learned that Anna’s hummingbirds consume more insects than the typical hummingbird.
There sure are a lot of pretty hummers!

spitfyr323 said...

I learned that "Ruby-Throated hummingbirds breed in most areas of eastern North America." I just saw one up close and personal for the first time in my life about two months ago. So lovely!

spitfyr323 at hotmail dot com

spitfyr323 said...

I'm a subscriber!

spitfyr323 at hotmail dot com

clynsg said...

I learned that they have a listing of birdwatching areas on their site--although I also learned that it is not entirely complete!

clynsg at yahoo.com

clynsg said...

Blog follower

clynsg at yahoo.com

Brenda said...

I learned that the Calliope Hummingbird is the smallest bird found in the US and Canada. I had no idea.

Tammy said...

Theres a website that actually shows hummingbirds migrations

Tamara B. said...

I learned alot about different types of birds especially the American Goldfinch is found in most areas of North America except the American Southwest, the American Goldfinch has an amazing, daring courtship ritual as the male circles the female in midflight.
tamben7996(at)aol(dot)com

Tamara B. said...

I am a subscriber.
tamben7996(at)aol(dot)com

Anonymous said...

I love the top loading feature on the hummingbird feeder. Great idea!

FrIeNdS said...

There are over 1,000,000 birds to view in Alaska!

Amber
Crystalclearbc@aol.com

Anonymous said...

I learned that there are sooo...many kinds of hummingbirds and that they can be quite territorial and aggressive.

bgcchs(at)yahoo(dot)com

Anonymous said...

I subscribe via email.

bgcchs(at)yahoo(dot)com

msmouse871 said...

that hummingbirds do a non-stop flight of up to 500 miles, which takes approximately 18-22 hours.

nala07102002 said...

never have enough feeder great

barbara said...

I learned that If you choose to pole mount your feeder; make sure the pole is at least 5 1/2 feet in length. This will allow you to place the pole approximately one foot into the ground and still keep the bottom of the feeder four feet off the ground. You may also want to add a squirrel baffle.

barbara said...

already follow you on blogger

Lauren L said...

I learned that bird baths should be placed near shrubs, so that the wet birds (who have trouble flying) have a safe place to hide from predators.

Pam said...

I learned the Magnificent Hummingbird (which is BEAUTIFUL!) lives in Central Mexico.

Pam said...

I'm a follower.

Thanks so much!
pamelashockley(AT)netscape(DOT)net

Anonymous said...

I learned that the Broad Tailed
Hummingbirds hunt insects
Thanks for the contest
Cathy Truman
kbtruman@aol.com

Egare1 said...

I learned that there are a lot of different types of hummingbird! I'm going to have to watch mine carefully when they're feeding from my mimosa to see what kind they are!

Egare1 said...

I'm a follower and a subscriber!

Thanks for the great giveaway :)

Mary said...

I learned that black oil sunflower is preferred by the greatest variety of birds.
Thanks!

Mary said...

I am a follower (google)

ShesAnAngel said...

I didn't realize that hummingbirds migrated!

justine417@comcast.net

ShesAnAngel said...

I subscribed via email

justine417@comcast.net

ShesAnAngel said...

I tweeted the giveaway

http://twitter.com/ShesAnAngel417/status/3206179876

justine417@comcast.net

JeansandTs said...

JeansandTs@hotmail.com
I learned that Hummingbird feeders can be elegant works of art. I especially like the Birdscapes® Looking Glass Hummingbird Feeder.

ehhogan said...

I like their link to hummingbirds.net1

ehhogan at bellsouth.net

jeannie said...

Ruby-Throated hummingbirds prefer to live in deciduous and pine forests, farm orchards and flowering gardens.These tiny birds can also be found in neighborhood yards where hummingbird feeders are present.

weblynx said...

I learned there are more than one type of hummingbird

weblynx at hotmail.com

Chris said...

I didn't know that male Allen's Hummingbirds are very aggressive and territorial!

erma said...

In Alaska there are over 1 million birds to view during their 24-hour days in the month of June. WOW!
erma.hurtt@sbcglobal.net

djgroz said...

Each year, sometimes as early as January, hummingbirds (specifically the Ruby-throated species*) embark on a journey that requires a great deal of their time and energy. They begin their return voyage sometimes as early as mid-July. This journey, also known as migration, is part of the hummingbird lifecycle and necessary for their survival.
Thanks for the chance to win a prize!

RR said...

I learned that birds must keep their feathers clean in order to fly properly.

Anonymous said...

Birds need a water supply to keep their feathers clean to be able to fly properly.

faery13 at msn dot com

onosquanna said...

I checked out the site a found they a really cool wild bird Library.

Kate said...

This was helpful:

Place your bird bath in the shade, near trees or shrubs if possible. The shade keeps the water from evaporating quickly and keeps it fresher.

onosquanna said...

I subscribed

TXsunlover said...

I learned that it is recommended that you clean your seed feeder every two weeks and your hummingbird feeder every week.
Thanks for the chance to win!
proudyaya04 {at} yahoo {dot} com

TXsunlover said...

I'm a subscriber!
proudyaya04 {at} yahoo {dot} com

skys said...

Ruby-Throated hummingbirds breed in most areas of eastern North America
skyxsky27(at)gmail.com

sharonjo said...

Like us birds need food, water and shelter! I came home from shopping and found a poor dead Brown Thresher on my porch this afternoon. The bird probably flew into the side of my house at a high speed which killed it. I love birds and have several bird feeders. We need to take care of our birds! Thanks! senekers@comcast.net

kngmckellar said...

Black-Oil Sunflower is preferred by the greatest variety of birds. I didn't know this!

kngmckellar@hotmail.com

kngmckellar said...

follow on google as kngmckellar

kngmckellar@hotmail.com

Qwill said...

I learned that to discourage pigeons (which I hate) you should use feeders without perches.

Qwill said...

I tweeted: http://twitter.com/qwills2cats/status/3236705177

2kidsblogger said...

If you are hanging your feeder from a tree branch, try and locate it at least twelve feet from any tree trunk or limb and at least four feet up from the ground. This will prevent squirrels from either jumping from the tree or up from the ground onto the feeder.

thanks for sponsoring this.

2kidsblogger(at)gmail(dot)com

2kidsblogger said...

Subscribed via email

thanks for sponsoring this.

2kidsblogger(at)gmail(dot)com

2kidsblogger said...

im a Google follower

thanks for sponsoring this.

2kidsblogger(at)gmail(dot)com

Candie said...

I never knew there were products to keep the squirrels out (guess never thought of them as pests). Thank you

candieluster(at)gmail(dot)com

prplrush said...

I learned that I should clean my seed feeder every two weeks and my hummingbird feeder every week.

prplrush said...

I am following your blog via google.

Deb said...

I learned that the Perky-Pet Ant Guard uses Permethrin to repel ants and is proven safe around birds, pets and people.

Deb said...

I'm a follower!

Deb said...

I tweeted here
http://twitter.com/tnshadylady/status/3243767136

djgroz said...

I should of Placed my bird bath in the shade, near trees or shrubs if possible. The shade keeps the water from evaporating quickly and keeps it fresher.
Thanks for the chance to win a prize!

pat jasmin said...

i feed the humming birds all summer long, ND THEY DO FIGHT OVER A FEEDER

Smooshy said...

i learned you should put your bird baths in the shade!

k2k said...

I learned that orioles will drink nectar!
krkury at gmail dot com

Anonymous said...

good

ladyvon said...

I learned that the Rufous Hummingbird is territorial and will attempt to drive out all birds from it's domain.

ladyvon said...

I subscribed via email today.

Shelly said...

Place your bird bath in the shade, near trees or shrubs if possible. The shade keeps the water from evaporating quickly and keeps it fresher.

Shelly said...

follower

Shelly said...

tweet http://twitter.com/phxbne/status/3247013068

Shelly said...

Place bird bath in the shade, near trees or shrubs if possible. The shade keeps the water from evaporating quickly and keeps it fresher.

Shelly said...

follower

Shelly said...

tweet http://twitter.com/phxbne/status/3247048688

JB said...

Some hummingbirds can be territorial and aggressive. I've seen that first hand

Deb said...

I learned that you should set your bird baths in the shade instead of in the sun.

kathy pease said...

Bird houses are a good way to attract those species of birds that nest in holes. These structures should be made of an untreated wood (pine, cedar, etc.) and should have ventilation and drainage holes. It should be durable, and easy to check and clean

kathy pease said...

following your blog as klp1965
kathy pease

kathy pease said...

http://twitter.com/klp1965/status/3250361990

purango said...

I learned that Black-Oil Sunflower Seedsare the preferred food by the greatest variety of birds. garrettsambo@aol.com

Anonymous said...

Hummingbirds are so gorgeous and we see an abundance of them here...

mzpaw@yahoo.com

Renee G said...

I learned that hummingbirds return to central america during winter months in order to survive.

rsgrandinetti@yahoo.com

Nancy said...

Whether you are an experienced hobbyist or an amateur bird watcher, there is a feeder to fit each and every lifestyle.
ncschools at yahoo dot com

tina said...

i just found out that hummingbirds can be especially territorial and aggressive birds. thanks for the chance to win eaglesforjack@gmail.com

tina said...

i follow your blog thanks for the chance to win eaglesforjack@gmail.com

Nancy said...

I follow your blog.
ncschools at yahoo dot com

tina said...

i subscribe by email thanks for the chance to win eaglesforjack@gmail.com

Nancy said...

I tweeted.
http://twitter.com/ncschools/status/3258082380
ncschools at yahoo dot com

lilyk said...

I learned that hummingbirds can be especially territorial and aggressive birds.

lilyk@mail2world.com

lilyk said...

I subscribed by email.

lilyk@mail2world.com

Gianna said...

Anna’s hummingbirds consume more insects than the typical hummingbird :)

Donna said...

They have a squirrel be gone feeder.
donna444444@yahoo.com

Donna said...

subscriber
donna444444@yahoo.com

Naddez said...

There are alot of hummingbirds. Wow!
sam94son05@sbcglobal.net

Naddez said...

Email Subscriber.
sam94son05@sbcglobal.net