Wednesday, April 29, 2009

How Green Is Your Green?


Spring is so fickle this year. One day it's 70 degrees, and the next it's back to 45. I don't know when I'll actually be able to do some real gardening! One thing I do know is that all of the rain has turned this part of the world into an artist's palette of green!

On a driving trip up north a few days ago, I realized that here in Michigan, we sometimes take our green for granted. We say to our neighbors, "boy it sure greened up, didn't it?" But then we go about our business and forget to really look at it.

I truly love Michigan in the spring. There are so many colors of green that it's impossible to name them all. After a dark rainy day, when the sun bursts through the clouds, it's almost blinding with color!

Here are some samples of my back yard. I wish I had taken pictures on my road trip.


Blue-green ivy and lime green hosta sprouts.



Emerald green grass.



Forest green pine trees.


A River of Green.


Green ready to pop.


Green tinged with red.


Green edged with white.

The garden is sprouting shades of jade, moss green, and mint.

Years ago, I attended a quilt seminar. The speaker talked about different colors of green and how each state has it's particular shades and hues of greens which are reflected in the fabric stores in that area and therefore shows up in the quilts -- becoming a way to research the origin of old quilts. It was the first time I was aware of the many colors of green.

What shades of green are you seeing now?




Don't forget to visit An Herbal Bedfellow for healthy recipes made with herbs, and also my newest blog:
Happenstance House -- A journal about my Victorian home and all of it's contents.

5 comments:

Kim and Victoria said...

How interesting about the different colors of green in each state. We see mostly blue-green here.

Mildred said...

Your yard is beautiful.

Here in Ga, before the heat of mid-summer, everything is bright green.

Lucy Corrander said...

I took a train trip on a little Dorset branch line recently, where the fields are small and have hedges round the edge, chequerboard style. The grass was very green, bright and cheerful, and many of the squares were marked round with blackthorn blossom (which is white) . . . as you say, like a quilt.

Lucy

Tracy said...

You're so right! We do not have those brilliant hues in Florida.

Anonymous said...

Your peony tree is exquisite.